New Brieten Womens Rhinestone Buckle Mesh Lace Up Flats Black P3oVuU

B00HQ7DZRK
New Brieten Womens Rhinestone Buckle Mesh Lace Up Flats Black P3oVuU
  • synthetic-and-rubber
  • Rubber sole
  • Clearance Sale
  • Free shipping & 1-3 days priority USPS
  • Lace Up
  • Flat Sneaker
New Brieten Womens Rhinestone Buckle Mesh Lace Up Flats Black P3oVuU New Brieten Womens Rhinestone Buckle Mesh Lace Up Flats Black P3oVuU New Brieten Womens Rhinestone Buckle Mesh Lace Up Flats Black P3oVuU New Brieten Womens Rhinestone Buckle Mesh Lace Up Flats Black P3oVuU

The first is a book of Mennonite history and doctrine by Galenus Abrahamsz de Haan given to Jacob Beukenberg, an orphan living in the Weehuis in Amsterdam, on April 23, 1710.

Another is an emblem book of poems, scripture, and illustrations given to Gerardus de Wind on the 22nd of April 1753.

The third is and final one I will highlight is a small book of martyr stories by Thielman van Braght (best known as compiler and author of the Martyrs Mirror) presented to Pieter Corver on the 26th of February 1774.

Keith Sprunger, emeritus professor of history at Bethel College, studied these books twenty years ago during a research trip to the Menno Simons Historical Library. He notes that “the provider of the books was usually a church member who was a printer or ran a book store” 1 . Many Dutch Mennonites had warmly embraced this new printing technology, with some becoming quite rich from the enterprise. Sprunger writes that “This era was . . . the heroic age of Dutch Mennonite printing” and that “the Mennonite churches made great use of the printed word for advancing their religion” 2 .

Is the printed word still valued by Mennonites? The existence of Herald Press, MennoMedia, and the various Mennonite libraries and archives scattered around North America are hopeful indicators to me that as Mennonites we still make great use of the printed word to transmit our faith, heritage, and the good news of Jesus to the next generation. M any congregations today maintain traditions of giving their young people Bibles or books when they are baptized or reach other milestones.

But the news is full of stories of traditional forms of media struggling to maintain viability in the face of a population becoming ever-more reliant on instant access via the internet, social media, and smartphones. And while I believe technology is a fantastic tool to meet many communication and learning needs, it is clear that when it comes to leaving a long-term record it is not as enduring or reliable as print media. The prize books I mentioned above have been preserved in their original form for nearly three hundred years; computers from twenty years ago have long been relegated to the trash heap. Just as technology has enabled us to preserve through digitization and increase access through web content, it also presents major problems of preservation and access of records based in formats that are now obsolete. While it is tempting to continue chasing the new and best technology trends, I think it is wise to take a step back and consider how we can also continue to support and use print resources to leave a record and transmit our traditions to future generations of believers. There is value in possessing tangible resources that we can peruse and return to years later without worrying about data migration, file format compatibility, and URL stability. The young people who received these books appreciated them as the prize they were and we would do well to remember in our ever-changing and fast-paced world that there are still many rewards to be found between the covers of a good book.

A team at the University of Oxford has been appointed as the independent evaluator and will run a two-armed randomised controlled trial (RCT).

120 schools will be recruited for this trial. In each school, a class teacher in Year 1 will identify 10 students who would benefit from 30 minutes per day of extra maths input, based on set criteria. The schools will then be randomised: 60 to support these students to use the onebillion app in this time, and 60 to be part of a business-as-usual control group, implementing the maths intervention they would normally put in place during this 30 minutes per day. Recruitment will be in summer/autumn 2017, with randomisation in spring 2018, and the intervention running from February for 12 school weeks.

The evaluation report will be published in Autumn 2019.

Skechers Sport Mens Agility Outfield Oxford Charcoal/Orange obEyPpczXH
Camel Mens Composite Toe Leather Insulated Construction Windproof Nonslip Worker Boots Brown AySvfnRTJ0
Canvas shoes custom Graffiti Eyes High top womens black classic casual fashion canvas sneakers ktimmBk
Progress: 80%

Pupils

1,200

Schools

120

Grant

£230,000

M

Mathematics

11th January, 2018 - Project/EEF_onebillion-year-1-pupils-learning-maths-on-apps_Summary.pdf

prev next
swipe for more

University of Nottingham and Durham University

St

Staff deployment development

Happy Feet Mens and Womens OFFICIALLY LICENSED NCAA College Sneaker Slippers Mississippi Rebels 8ioIP
F

Feedback monitoring pupil progress

Testing a programme to increase mathematical competence and confidence at Key Stage 3.

Progress: 80%

University of Manchester

Schools

110

Grant

£969,611

St

Staff deployment development

M

Mathematics

F

Feedback monitoring pupil progress

Association of Employment and Learning Providers

FE

Post-16

M

Mathematics

Coach Womans Gayle Wedge Saddle E5qy4cGkm

Testing whether teachers can be supported to contextualise English and mathematics lessons for post-16 learners

Progress: 80%

London School of Economics

Schools

100

Grant

£606,350

FE

Post-16

M

Mathematics

L

Language and literacy

CafePress Wonderful Woodstock Flip Flops Funny Thong Sandals Beach Sandals Pink GwR33cn1P
DStory Custom Shark Teeth Striped Rainbow Womens Classic Canvas Shoes Fashion Sneaker Shark3 l4IfEhn1
L

Language and literacy

Training Teaching Assistants to support early language development

Authors: Fedor Petrov , Inkach Womens Wedges Sandals Fashion Summer Sandals Chunky Heel FlipFlops Slippers Heeled Shoes Blue w74Gx5op4s

Abstract : Let G G be a finite group, and let r_{3}(G) r 3 ( G ) represent the size of the largest subset of G G without non-trivial three-term progressions. In a recent breakthrough, Croot, Lev and Pach proved that r_{3}(C_{4}^{n}) \leqslant (3.61)^{n} r 3 ( C n 4 ) ( 3.61 ) n , where C_{m} C m denotes the cyclic group of order m m . For finite abelian groups G \cong \prod_{i=1}^{n} C_{m_{i}} G n i = 1 C m i , where m_{1},\ldots,m_{n} m 1 , , m n denote positive int… ▽ More Let G be a finite group, and let r_{3}(G) represent the size of the largest subset of G without non-trivial three-term progressions. In a recent breakthrough, Croot, Lev and Pach proved that r_{3}(C_{4}^{n}) \leqslant (3.61)^{n} , where C_{m} denotes the cyclic group of order m . For finite abelian groups G \cong \prod_{i=1}^{n} C_{m_{i}} , where m_{1},\ldots,m_{n} denote positive integers such that m_{1} | \ldots | m_{n} , this also yields a bound of the form r_{3}(G) \leqslant (0.903)^{\operatorname{rk}_{4}(G)} |G| , with \operatorname{rk}_{4}(G) representing the number of indices i \in \left\{1,\ldots,n\right\} with 4\ |\ m_{i} . In particular, r_{3}(C_{8}^{n}) \leqslant (7.22)^{n} . In this paper, we provide an exponential improvement for this bound, namely r_{3}(C_{8}^{n}) \leq (7.09)^{n} . △ Less

AmoonyFashion Womens Pull On Imitated Suede Pointed Closed Toe Spikes Stilettos PumpsShoes Pink 36 Mt0xgp
BalaMasa Ladies Lace Hollow Out Leopard Pattern American Muffin Buttom Imitated Leather Boots Black PwIxg574bX

To demonstrate, or not to demonstrate?

As the atomic bomb was becoming a technological reality, there were many scientists on the Manhattan Projectwho found themselves wondering about both the ethics and politics of a surprise, unwarned nuclear attack on a city. Many of them, even at very high levels, wondered about whether the very threat of the bomb, properly displayed, might be enough, without the loss of life that would come with a military attack.

Matt Bernson FREETHROW HdnTT2Ql
, written in June 1945 by scientists working at the University of Chicago Metallurgical laboratory, put it perhaps most eloquently:

the way in which nuclear weapons, now secretly developed in this country, will first be revealed to the world appears of great, perhaps fateful importance. …It will be very difficult to persuade the world that a nation which was capable of secretly preparing and suddenly releasing a weapon, as indiscriminate as the rocket bomb and a thousand times more destructive, is to be trusted in its proclaimed desire of having such weapons abolished by international agreement….

From this point of view a demonstration of the new weapon may best be made before the eyes of representatives of all United Nations, on the desert or a barren island. The best possible atmosphere for the achievement of an international agreement could be achieved if America would be able to say to the world, “You see what weapon we had but did not use. We are ready to renounce its use in the future and to join other nations in working out adequate supervision of the use of this nuclear weapon.”

They even went so far as to suggest, in a line that was until recently totally etched out of thehistorical record by the Manhattan Project censors, that “We fear its early unannounced use might cause other nations to regard us as a nascent Germany.”

The evolution of the “Trinity” test fireball, at constant scale, with the Empire State Building for additional scale reference.

The idea of a “demonstration” was for many scientists a compelling one, and news of the ideaspread to the various project sites. The idea would be to let the Japanese know what awaited them if they did not surrender. This would be more than just a verbal or textual warning, which could be disregarded as propaganda — they would set the bomb off somewhere where casualties would be low or minimal, but its nature easy to verify. If the demonstration did not work, if the Japanese were not receptive, then the bomb could be used as before. In the eyes of these scientists, there would be no serious loss to do it this way, and perhaps much to gain.

Of course, not all scientists saw it this way. In his cover letter forwarding the Franck Report to the Secretary of War, the physicist Arthur Compton, head of the Chicago laboratory, noted his own doubts: 1. if it didn’t work, it would be prolonging the war, which would cost lives; and 2. “without a military demonstration it may be impossible to impress the world with the need for national sacrifices in order to gain lasting security.” This last line is the more interesting one in my eyes: Compton saw dropping the bomb on a city as a form of “demonstration,” a “military demonstration,” and thought that taking a lot of life now would be necessary to scare the world into banning these weapons in the future. This view, that the bombs were something more than just weapons, butvisual arguments, comes across in Reef Womens Stargazer Sassy Sandal Taupe Grey tJmKCA
.

©2018 The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois

1004 South Fourth Street Champaign, Illinois 61820 [email protected]

Phone (217) 333-0885 TTY (217) 244-9850 Fax (217) 244-9136